Fledgling review: Inkdeath by Cornelia Funke

InkDeath is the final enthralling chapter to the InkHeart trilogy. After being pulled into the InkWorld by Meggie’s voice in InkSHeart (the first book) she and Farid have finally split ways due to the rift created by the sacrifice of Dustfinger in exchange for Farid’s life. But the death of Dustfinger is not the only tragedy to befall them, for The Adderhead has become immortal and set his brother-in- law the Milksop as ruler of Ombra. Mo has fully transformed into the Bluejay, a masked hero who fools the rich and defends the poor, known as the White Hand of Justice. In a foolish venture Mo is captured and is taken to the Castle on the Lake by Her Ugliness to await her father the Adderhead’s arrival with all her hope staked on one card.

But who are the heroes of this story? Can the Black Prince, Mo’s fellow Black Hand of Justice, save him and all the children of Ombra from the Piper, The Adderhead’s tin nosed herald? Will the Ugliness’ bet pay off? What does death really mean? Find out by reading the grand finale to the InkHeart trilogy!

 Cornelia Funke uses some amazing description when setting up her locations in this whole trilogy. Every place has at least a paragraph devoted not just to where a place is and what it looks like, but why it is the way it is as well. For example, when Fenoglio walks into Ombra castle with Meggie in the second book InkSpell, he thinks about how happy he is with the way it came into existence, through his writing of course.

 Funke describes the birdsong of the Gold Mockers of Ombra castle and how Fenoglio spent so long describing them in his InkHeart. When the Castle on the Lake is described Funke draws in your mind how the lake was the best defensive weapon imaginable; as the lakes bridge was only wide enough for one rider and it was so deep a giant couldn’t walk through it, nor boats cross it due to the monsters Her Ugliness’ great-grandfather bred in it. The plot is filled with unimaginable twists and turns alongside characters who come back to haunt you. This is my second favourite set of books.

Review by Sam