Posts tagged fledgling
Fledgling Review: Rose Rivers by Jaqueline Wilson
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Rose is tired of living with her younger siblings and being treated like a young child, especially now her twin brother is at school and hasn’t written to her once. But when her sister Beth gets a new and horrible nurse, Rose’s life is turned upside down...  This book is different from other Jacqueline Wilsons because the main character is a bit older than most. Rose is a strong feminist heroine who is thoroughly indignant about inequality. I raced through this book and want to read it again!

Review by Edie
 

Fledgling review: Begone the Raggedy Witches by Celine Kiernan
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Begone the Raggedy Witches by Celine Kiernan
Review by Sine

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Mup, a normal girl, is driving home from seeing her ill aunty when a strange sight greets her. In the trees are what looks like witches. She thinks she is safe but the witches come to take her Mam away to the sparkling kingdom. Luckily Mup, Badger the dog and the ghost of her aunty manage to get her back. When they think the danger is gone they hear on the radio that Mup's father has disappeared.They all knew he had been taken to the sparkling kingdom. Reluctantly, Aunty follows Mup, Mam,Tipper (Mup's baby brother) and Badger over the border where they meet Crow, a rhyming raven who can turn into a boy, who follows them on their mission to save Mup’s father. Mup and her rather large group meet lots of new people as they travel around the sparkling kingdom to save Mup’s Dad.

I enjoyed this magical adventure story as you never knew what would happen next.

Fledgling review: Tender Earth by Sita Brahmachari
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When Laila finds her grandmother’s Protest Book, she is instantly inspired.  Her first move is to become a vegetarian, after she sees the unfair way animals are treated.  She uses her grandmother’s handpainted banner on her first march – a women’s march.  When she meets Pari, a refugee, she sees the conditions the family lives in and knows she has to do something…  This is a story perfect for firing up young protestors, showing how we can all live on this Tender Earth.  

Reviewed by Edie

Fledgling review: Inkdeath by Cornelia Funke

InkDeath is the final enthralling chapter to the InkHeart trilogy. After being pulled into the InkWorld by Meggie’s voice in InkSHeart (the first book) she and Farid have finally split ways due to the rift created by the sacrifice of Dustfinger in exchange for Farid’s life. But the death of Dustfinger is not the only tragedy to befall them, for The Adderhead has become immortal and set his brother-in- law the Milksop as ruler of Ombra. Mo has fully transformed into the Bluejay, a masked hero who fools the rich and defends the poor, known as the White Hand of Justice. In a foolish venture Mo is captured and is taken to the Castle on the Lake by Her Ugliness to await her father the Adderhead’s arrival with all her hope staked on one card.

But who are the heroes of this story? Can the Black Prince, Mo’s fellow Black Hand of Justice, save him and all the children of Ombra from the Piper, The Adderhead’s tin nosed herald? Will the Ugliness’ bet pay off? What does death really mean? Find out by reading the grand finale to the InkHeart trilogy!

 Cornelia Funke uses some amazing description when setting up her locations in this whole trilogy. Every place has at least a paragraph devoted not just to where a place is and what it looks like, but why it is the way it is as well. For example, when Fenoglio walks into Ombra castle with Meggie in the second book InkSpell, he thinks about how happy he is with the way it came into existence, through his writing of course.

 Funke describes the birdsong of the Gold Mockers of Ombra castle and how Fenoglio spent so long describing them in his InkHeart. When the Castle on the Lake is described Funke draws in your mind how the lake was the best defensive weapon imaginable; as the lakes bridge was only wide enough for one rider and it was so deep a giant couldn’t walk through it, nor boats cross it due to the monsters Her Ugliness’ great-grandfather bred in it. The plot is filled with unimaginable twists and turns alongside characters who come back to haunt you. This is my second favourite set of books.

Review by Sam

Fledgling review: The Last Duchess by Laura Powell

Dragons and duchesses..Pattern meets them all. Her Highness Eleri, Pattern's mistress and best friend, suspects her uncle Prince Leopold of disguised crop destruction and child kidnapping. Accusing her uncle of plotting murder, Eleri's suspicions take a turn as a wonderful twist takes place.
An amazing mystery story perfect for fans of Robin Stevens and Katherine Woodfine and other mystery writers.

Review by Sine

One adventurous girl, sent to work for the duchess-to-be of Elfinheim, one ancient conspiracy…  What could possibly go wrong?  When Pattern is sent to be lady’s maid in the far kingdom of Elfinheim she is caught up in a plot lasting for decades whilst making a friend for life.  Can she stopthe conspiracy and save countless souls, or will her mistress and best friend become the Last Duchess of Elfinheim.  A fast-paced, action-packed tale full of fun, feisty, females, The Last Duchess is the ultimate comeback for people who say girls can’t star in adventure stories!

Review by Edie